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Crohn's Disease, Bacteria, and Diet

Crohn's Disease is a form of intestinal bowel disease (IBD) which is thought to have genetic and environmental causes.  Based on a published study in the World Journal of Gastroenterology dated June 21, 2014, a bacteria called Mycobacterium Avium plays a role in 30-50% of those with Crohn's.  What role it plays is not specified, but it is suspected to be a triggering factor or possibly root cause.  In another recent study published in the Journal of Rheumatology (October, 2013), a bacteria called Klebsiella is implicated in causing or worsening Crohn's.  In this study the authors recommend a low-starch diet as a means of trying to lower the bacteria, and they point to the fact that starch consumption creates a favorable environment for Klebsiella.  They then made some general dietary recommendations based upon this, and here they are (If you have IBD, discuss dietary changes with your Doctor):
Recommended Diet for Crohn's Disease and Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients
Decreased Intake of “High-Starch-Containing Foods”
  1. Flour and related products: breads, biscuits, cakes, puddings, pies, and popcorn.
  2. Pasta products: macaronis, noodles, spaghetti, pizzas, and pastry.
  3. Rice varieties: brown or white, boiled, fried, or in puddings.
  4. Potatoes: baked, boiled, fried, roasted, or mashed potatoes.
 
Increased Intake of “None-Low-Starch-Containing Foods”
  1. Meat: beef, pork, lamb, bacon, salami, corned beef, luncheon mean, potted meat, ham, and veal as well as chicken, turkey duck, or any other poultry meat.
  2. Fish: white fish such as cod, haddock, plaice, and sole; shellfish such as crab, lobster, prawns, scampi, cockles, mussels, and oysters; and other fish such as herring, salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines.
  3. Milk products: fresh, dried, or condensed milk, plain and flavoured yoghurts, and all types of cheese.
  4. Eggs: prepared in any manner.
  5. Vegetables: green vegetables such as cabbages, cauliflowers, sprouts, courgettes, peppers, mushrooms, carrots, and spinach or all salad vegetables like lettuce, cucumber, tomatoes, and water cress.
  6. Fruits: any types of fruits.
 
Related to this, Rush University did a study which showed better microbial diversity in those who followed a lower-starch diet called the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.
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